THE STORY


14 February 2010 (Year of the Tiger) – We received a report of a tiger carcass at the Sungai Yu (Yu River) Ecological Corridor, which turned out to be a Sun Bear that was snared, skinned, had its paws chopped off and dumped into a river.


The Sun Bear wasn’t the intended target, as other animal carcasses were rotting nearby. The poachers were after a specific animal. The tiger. But snares, like land mines, kill or maim their victims indiscriminately.


Snares are cruel, and illegal under the Wildlife Conservation Act 2010. Snare victims suffer, trying to desperately escape the hold of the ever-tightening snare. Some die in the process, others, at the hands of the poachers who retrieve the snares.


Thousands of snares have been found and removed from all over Malaysia. But hundreds, maybe thousands more, are set every day, hidden in the forest for innocent wildlife victims. We need your help to put more boots on the ground to make the forests safe again.


To reduce the threat of poaching at the Sungai Yu Ecological Corridor, a known poaching hotspot, MYCAT initiated the CAT Walk programme.


Signing up gives you the chance to deter poaching with your presence and watchful eye in poaching hotspots.

THE STORY


14 February 2010 (Year of the Tiger) – We received a report of a tiger carcass at the Sungai Yu (Yu River) Ecological Corridor, which turned out to be a Sun Bear that was snared, skinned, had its paws chopped off and dumped into a river.

The Sun Bear wasn’t the intended target, as other animal carcasses were rotting nearby. The poachers were after a specific animal. The tiger. But snares, like land mines, kill or maim their victims indiscriminately.

Snares are cruel, and illegal under the Wildlife Conservation Act 2010. Snare victims suffer, trying to desperately escape the hold of the ever-tightening snare. Some die in the process, others, at the hands of the poachers who retrieve the snares.

Thousands of snares have been found and removed from all over Malaysia. But hundreds, maybe thousands more, are set every day, hidden in the forest for innocent wildlife victims. We need your help to put more boots on the ground to make the forests safe again.

To reduce the threat of poaching at the Sungai Yu Ecological Corridor, a known poaching hotspot, MYCAT initiated the CAT Walk programme.


Signing up gives you the chance to deter poaching with your presence and watchful eye in poaching hotspots.

PROJECT SITE

The Sungai Yu (Yu River) Ecological Corridor is a narrow stretch of stateland forests surrounding Sungai Yu, located 15km south of the Taman Negara entrance in Sungai Relau (Relau River), Pahang.

Linking the Titiwangsa Main Range and Taman Negara, it is a route that many animals use to move between the two largest forested landscapes in Malaysia.

PROJECT SITE

The Sungai Yu (Yu River) Ecological Corridor is a narrow stretch of stateland forests surrounding Sungai Yu, located 15km south of the Taman Negara entrance in Sungai Relau (Relau River), Pahang.

Linking the Titiwangsa Main Range and Taman Negara, it is a route that many animals use to move between the two largest forested landscapes in Malaysia.

PARTNER AND SUPPORTERS


OFFICIAL PARTNER


The Department of Wildlife and National Parks Peninsular Malaysia is an official partner of the CAT programme.

FINANCIAL SUPPORT



Official sponsors for the CAT programme for 2018/2019 are the Government of Malaysia through the National Conservation Trust Fund, US Fish and Wildlife Service and the Wildlife Reserves Singapore Group.
Many have contributed to the implementation of CAT Walk since 2010. The official sponsors over RM50,000 are: 21st Century Tiger, European Outdoor Conservation Association, IUCN SOS, National Conservation Trust Fund, Prince Bernhard Nature Conservation, The Body Shop, UNDP-GEF-SGP, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Van Tienhoven Foundation, Wildlife Reserves Singapore Group, and anonymous donors.

PARTNER AND SUPPORTERS


OFFICIAL PARTNER
The Department of Wildlife and National Parks Peninsular Malaysia is an official partner of the CAT programme.

FINANCIAL SUPPORT



Official sponsors for the CAT programme for 2018/2019 are the Government of Malaysia through the National Conservation Trust Fund, US Fish and Wildlife Service and the Wildlife Reserves Singapore Group.
Many have contributed to the implementation of CAT Walk since 2010. The official sponsors over RM50,000 are: 21st Century Tiger, European Outdoor Conservation Association, IUCN SOS, National Conservation Trust Fund, Prince Bernhard Nature Conservation, The Body Shop, UNDP-GEF-SGP, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Van Tienhoven Foundation, Wildlife Reserves Singapore Group, and anonymous donors.

CAT WALKERS



As of 2018, a total of 1,788 people deactivated 166 snares while walking and protecting 3,321km of critical habitat.
CAT Walks are popular with non-Malaysians too, with CAT Walkers coming from 36 countries and counting.

CERTIFIED VOLUNTEER LEADERS

CERTIFIED VOLUNTEER LEADERS

HELEN JOHNNY

Hailing from Sabah, Helen is an ethnobotany expert and is completely at home in the forest.  As a child, she followed her policeman father into the Borneo forests, often camping overnight. Always intrigued by the secrets of the forest, her thirst for adventure led her to qualify as a Combat Medic in the Royal Malay Regiment of the Malaysian Army. After five years as a soldier, she now works with the videography department of the Education Ministry’s and is also a canoe instructor and amateur caver.

LUCAS LIM

Lucas hails from Seremban, Negeri Sembilan. Since he was very young, he has been drawn to the outdoors. As part of his profession, he visits all the states in Malaysia, offering him the opportunity to explore the forests, mountains and valleys of Malaysia and to observe how each state manages its natural resources. His knowledge of forest plants and animals makes him an ideal leader for CAT Walks.

MUNA NOOR

“I just keep thinking that every week, if I don’t do it, there could be poachers out there. Every time we go into the forest, we make a difference. What we do, it really counts; Muna is a Corporate Communications Specialist by day, but when she is in the city all she can think about is the forest, so once every three months, she dons her trekking gear and drives her 4×4 to the Corridor to lead CAT Walks. Muna hope to inspire others to get involved, especially people who have careers in the corporate world.

HELEN JOHNNY

Hailing from Sabah, Helen is an ethnobotany expert and is completely at home in the forest.  As a child, she followed her policeman father into the Borneo forests, often camping overnight. Always intrigued by the secrets of the forest, her thirst for adventure led her to qualify as a Combat Medic in the Royal Malay Regiment of the Malaysian Army. After five years as a soldier, she now works with the videography department of the Education Ministry’s and is also a canoe instructor and amateur caver.

LUCAS LIM

Lucas hails from Seremban, Negeri Sembilan. Since he was very young, he has been drawn to the outdoors. As part of his profession, he visits all the states in Malaysia, offering him the opportunity to explore the forests, mountains and valleys of Malaysia and to observe how each state manages its natural resources. His knowledge of forest plants and animals makes him an ideal leader for CAT Walks.

MUNA NOOR

“I just keep thinking that every week, if I don’t do it, there could be poachers out there. Every time we go into the forest, we make a difference. What we do, it really counts; Muna is a Corporate Communications Specialist by day, but when she is in the city all she can think about is the forest, so once every three months, she dons her trekking gear and drives her 4×4 to the Corridor to lead CAT Walks. Muna hope to inspire others to get involved, especially people who have careers in the corporate world.